Lotus Thompson and her troublesome legs

Olive Borden (left) and Australian actress Lotus Thompson (right). The source of this postcard, very widely available on the net, is unknown, as is the exact date it was taken. It is reputed to have been the mid twenties, when Borden was at the height of her Hollywood popularity and Thompson was just beginning to make her way. (The black borders have been added to make it fit this page.)

Lotus Thompson is remembered today largely because of a well-publicised incident in February 1925, when it was reported she had poured nitric acid on her herself, frustrated with Hollywood producers only offering her parts where she showed off her attractive legs. ”I’ll go mad if they don’t stop it!” she had wailed to her mother. “I know I can play parts, but they won’t give me a chance. It’s legs-always legs! I hate them!” Newspapers widely reported the event and she was even photographed in bed, burnt legs bandaged up. Film Weekly produced a sensational full-page sketch showing the scantily clad but distressed actress dribbling the acid on her legs. The journal suggested theatre owners might use the event to promote her latest film, The Yellow Back.

Lotus May Thompson, was born in Charters Towers, Queensland on 26th August 1904. She first performed on the Sydney stage in juvenile theatre in 1915, and thereafter appeared in concerts, fancy dress balls and carnivals. By 1921 she had featured in her first Australian film for Franklyn BarrettKnow Thy Child,  the film and her performance gaining some good reviews.  The Daily News of Western Australia suggested Lotus played her part with “admirable fidelity.”

Vera James and Lotus Thompson

Vera James (as the sickly “fallen woman” Sadie) and Lotus Thompson (as Eileen, her vibrant daughter with a rosy future) in “Know Thy Child” – Via Wikipedia commons.

She appeared in four more films in 1922-3;  The Dinkum Bloke for Lottie Lyell & Raymond Longford and several “Hayseed” family comedies for Beaumont Smith. Sadly, none of these are known to survive today.

lotus3

 

Lotus 1923s

By 1923 Lotus was well established as an up and coming Australian movie actress. There was endless positive publicity which largely focused on her physical appearance – as can be seen in these examples.
[Via National Library of Australia’s Trove; Sunday Times,28 January 1923,  The Sun Monday 24 April 1923]

Determined to pursue a career in film, on 5th March 1924 she sailed for California on the Matson liner Ventura, with her mother Sarah. She settled in Hollywood and a few bit parts followed, but she obviously found the going tough.

Lotus 1928

“Legs a Speciality” by Dorothy Wooldridge. Via Picture-Play Magazine, March-August 1928.

The “acid” incident occurred on 1st February 1925. Many fan magazines and newspapers in the US and Australia reported the incident, and it was regularly dredged out for the next few years, although not all papers accepted the story as fact. Everyones magazine seems to have identified it as nonsense in a May 1925 report. 

Eight years later, on a return to Australia, she told the truth. It was entirely a publicity stunt. She told Smith’s Weekly, the whole thing had been arranged by five men – ‘”publicity go-getters.’ She was told that the subtle hint that the directors couldn’t keep their eyes off her legs would provide a spicy and sensational story, and she would be overwhelmed with big film offers… The promise of fame lured her into agreeing to it… ‘I was not much more than a kid at the time, or I would never have entertained the proposition.'”

Lotus and Olive1All the same, the event did not hurt her career at all. By 1926, she was taking leading roles and she was posed prominently in a Paramount Studios photo lineup of major stars in late 1926. (See Daniel Blum’s Pictorial History of the Silent Movies, page 294 – via the Internet Archive). A string of movies followed, many of them Westerns, a few of them directed by Australian-born director J. P. McGowan.

In January 1929 she married Edward Wilder Churchill in Manhattan. The 1930 US census showed the young couple settling down to live with E Wilder Churchill Senior and his wife Alice on the family estate in California’s Napa Valley.  1929 was also her busiest year for acting, and then in 1930, she appeared in her last credited roll, as Eve in Cecil B. DeMille‘s saucy pre-code talkie, Madam Satan. (See a photo of Lotus in costume here – via Christina Stewart’s Pretty Clever Films)

For the next three years she did not appear in any films. Then without much warning, in August 1933, she was suddenly home in Australia again, supposedly forced to leave the US because she had overstayed her 6 months visa by some 9 years!

It was during this visit home that she owned up to the acid on the legs stunt. Yet she was not being entirely honest when she spoke of being thrown out of the US as an illegal immigrant, because it seems the return home to see her mother was more to do with the state of her marriage than her visa. She returned to the US in March 1934, but she followed this trip almost immediately with another to the UK, apparently to see if she could drum up any work. She returned to acting in the US, but the roles she was given were now un-credited – she had well and truly lost her currency in Hollywood. Her marriage to Churchill came to an end in 1936, and she remarried on April 18 1937, to Stanley Robinson at Tijuana, Mexico. Finally in 1939, she applied to become a naturalised US citizen. According to the Internet Movie Database, the last of her 37 roles in film was in 1949, although there is evidence she appeared in some films that are not recorded.

Unfortunately, of the last years of her life we know nothing, except that she lived comfortably on Laurel Canyon Drive and later in Burbank. She had no children from either marriage. She died in California in 1963, aged 59. Descendants of her extended family continue to live in Australia.

Note

  1.  Her date of birth. This is regularly and incorrectly stated across the web to be 1906. See the IMDB and Wikipedia for example. Queensland birth records are quite clear however. Both these articles contain numerous other errors.

Nick Murphy, May 2018

Further Reading

Liz Conor (2004) The Spectacular Modern Woman: Feminine Visibility in the 1920s. Indiana University Press

George A. Katchmer (2009) A Biographical Dictionary of Silent Film Western Actors and Actresses. McFarland

Buck Rainey (1992) Sweethearts of the sage: biographies and filmographies of 258 actresses appearing in western movies. McFarland

Andree Wright (1987) Brilliant Careers: Women in Australian Cinema. MacMillan

Further reading from National Library of Australia, Trove,
Digitised Newspaper Collection